Tower Running at Broadgate Tower

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One of my goals in undertaking the London Borough Challenge* was to help shine a light on the amazing variety of running opportunities there are in London. So when I came across Total Motion’s Tower Running Sessions at the Broadgate Tower in the City of London I had to give it a go.

Broadgate Tower has 35 floors – 877 steps – and I couldn’t imagine how most people could run up them. Turns out that, as Matt Hudson, founder of Total Motion, explained to me, most people don’t. They walk them instead.

Walking speeds and techniques vary a lot. Matt recommended taking the stairs two at time, while simultaneously using your arms and the handrails to help pull yourself up. A technique which seemed to suit me and which gives you a really good whole body work out.

The first time up I chatted the whole way with Matt and some of the other climbers. The second time up was OK and I just about kept the conversation going. The third time up was a different matter. I did most of it on my own and I was counting off each floor in an increasingly grim attempt to reach the top without stopping. It was a huge relief to get to the 35th floor and take the lift back down to the ground floor.

So what was it like? Great – and different from standard running which, when you run as much as I do, is a relief.

You can do the climb as often as you want in the one hour session meaning you can really get your heart pumping – or you can take it more gently. And the group is full of friendly people who made this first timer feel very welcome.

Thank you Matt, Sam and all my fellow climbers. I hope to be back soon!

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RTW Tower 3

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*In addition to completing a 10km run in all 206 countries in the world, I’m also doing 44 runs in the UK. Taking the global total to 250 runs.

Why? Because 250 runs is equivalent to running 2 500 000 metres. Which is a metre for every one of the two and a half million cancer sufferers in the UK.

All well and good but the question we asked ourselves at Run the World HQ is : where should those 44 UK runs take place? And part of the answer – three-quarters to be exact – is that 33 of them will take place in London. One in each of the 32 London boroughs plus one in the City of London.

We’re calling this the ‘London Borough Challenge’ and we’re really hoping that everyone will take part in some – or all – of the LBC!

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London Run 14 : Hammersmith & Fulham with We Are Runners

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

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Date : 13th  November, 2019

Time : 58’ 36”

Number of runners (total to date) : 18 (6604)

Run map and details : https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/4251161986

When I started out on the London Borough Challenge* addition to my Run the World challenge, I had mixed feelings. I thought it might be interesting to see more of London but my body wasn’t keen on the thought of yet more runs. What I hadn’t factored into the equation was all the brilliant people and groups I’d meet along the way.

Take Hannah for example. She and best friend Emily set up Twice The Health where, as their website puts it better than I could :

“We follow one mantra, which tends to coincide with everything we do from lunch to lunges… to ‘make health our happiness’. For us that’s mad running adventures, and exploring the ever growing food industry with preference always being on dessert. Of course, we’re always together and always wearing the exact same outfit from top to bottom!

We want to inspire YOU to create your own adventures, and challenge your own bodies however that may be!”

Twice the Health have a running club – ‘We Are Runners’ – which meets at various venues around the country on various nights of the week. On Wednesday evenings the club meets at lululemon at Westfield White City – it almost goes without saying that Hannah and Emily are lululemon ambassadors – and so that’s where I met them. (How come I’m not an ambassador for some sports gear brand?!? I know I always run in grubby old Run the World t shirts and too short track suit bottoms but I’m sure I’d scrub up quite nicely in some decent kit…)

As the club run was 6 km, Hannah and I met up beforehand for a 4 km pre-run and chat re Twice the Health. (I’m always fascinated by healthy living brands / businesses that are also scalable.)

We then returned to lululemon and met up with the rest of the group up which included Asem – a Saudi Arabia journalist who is now helping me with my upcoming run in Riyadh (5th December – my birthday – if you happen to be in the area) and Ellie who’s ‘leaving do run’ it was.

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We ran round various parts of Shepherds Bush and Holland Park before returning to lululemon for the now traditional end of run plank.

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Two of them in fact.

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It was a great run and I’m hoping to join you all again in Richmond as I continue with the London Borough Challenge – I can honestly say I now look forward to the runs!

It just remains for me to say a huge thank you to Hannah, Asem, Ellie, Laura and everyone at We Are Runners for the warm welcome!

I’d love it if you stayed involved with Run the World – either via social media (links below) or by joining in the UK, and final, leg of Run the World on Hampstead Heath on 4th July 2020!

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

*In addition to completing a 10km run in all 206 countries in the world, I’m also doing 44 runs in the UK. Taking the global total to 250 runs.

Why? Because 250 runs is equivalent to running 2 500 000 metres. Which is a metre for every one of the two and a half million cancer sufferers in the UK.

All well and good but the question we asked ourselves at Run the World HQ is : where should those 44 UK runs take place? And part of the answer – three-quarters to be exact – is that 33 of them will take place in London. One in each of the 32 London boroughs plus one in the City of London.

We’re calling this the ‘London Borough Challenge’ and we’re really hoping that everyone will take part in some – or all – of the LBC!

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London Run 13 : Bromley with the Marjorie McClure Specialist School

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 8th  November, 2019

Time : 1h 10’ 07”

Number of talk attendees (total to date) : 18 (5784)

Number of runners (total to date) : 30 (6586)

Run map and details : https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/4242508055

Panathlon is a fantastic charity that, last year, provided sporting and leadership opportunities to over 26 000 young people with disabilities and special educational needs. (If anyone reading this feels like making a donation then you can do so here. And then you should go along to one of Panathlon’s events to experience what it means to the participants.)

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I have the honour of sitting on its Board of Trustees and I asked Ashley, Panathlon’s CEO, if it might be possible to talk at some of the schools that participate in Panathlon’s events. The hope was that I’d be able to combine the talks with my London Borough Challenge runs – and that the students could join the start of the run.

Ashley was good enough to send out a few emails and Guy Wilkins at the Marjorie McClure Specialist School was good enough to invite me to talk.

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Before I get onto the talk, a bit of background. I’m currently undertaking a challenge – Run the World – to complete a 10 km run in all 206 countries in the world. (I’ve run in 181 countries to date.) I’m doing the challenge to raise funds for Cancer Research and to promote the importance of an active, healthy lifestyle.

The Run the World school talk combines stories from my runs around the world with healthy living advice focusing on exercise, diet and sleep.

I always enjoy giving the talks and this was no exception : the Marjorie McClure students were a great audience – even if they did give me a hard time about being a Spurs fan! It was also great to have Adil, a Marjorie McClure alumnus and one of my fellow Panathlon trustees, at the talk.

After the talk we went outside to the school playground where we were joined by the cross-country team from Coopers School (Marjorie McClure sits within the Coopers School grounds).

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We all ran round the playground for about a kilometre

before it was time to say goodbye to most of the Marjorie McClure students with handshakes, hugs and the odd bit of football banter!

I then ran round the Coopers playing fields with their cross country team and a couple of the Marjorie McClure students. Eventually I got to 5 km when it was time to join the Marjorie McClure teachers running club for the final 5 km around the rather lovely  ‘I can’t believe we’re in London’ Hawkwood Estate.

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It just remains for me to say that I very much hope the students enjoyed the talk and run as much as I enjoyed meeting them!

And I also hope they will stay involved with Run the World – either via social media (links below) or by joining in the UK, and final, leg of Run the World on Hampstead Heath on 4th July 2020.

Finally, a huge thank you to Guy, Head Teacher Mrs Cottage, the Coopers cross-country team, Ashley, Adil and all the staff and students at the school for the invitation and warm welcome!

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

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London Run 12 : Barking & Dagenham with Warren Junior School

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

 Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 4th  November, 2019

Time : 1h 08’ 15”

Number of talk attendees (total to date) : 220 (5766)

Number of runners (total to date) : 120 (6556)

Run map and details : https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/4228128625

Panathlon is a fantastic charity that, last year, provided sporting and leadership opportunities to over 26 000 school children with disabilities and special needs. (If anyone reading this feels like making a donation then you can do so here. And then you should go along to one of Panathlon’s events to experience what it means to the participants.)

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I have the honour of sitting on its Board of Trustees and I asked Ashley, Panathlon’s CEO, if it might be possible to talk at some of the schools that participate in Panathlon’s events. The hope was that I’d be able to combine the talks with my London Borough Challenge runs – and that the students could join the start of the run.

Ashley was good enough to send out a few emails and Jamie Bell, the Head of Warren Junior School, was good enough to invite me to talk.

Before I get onto the talk, a bit of background. I’m currently undertaking a challenge – Run the World – to complete a 10 km run in all 206 countries in the world. (I’ve run in 181 countries to date.) I’m doing the challenge to raise funds for Cancer Research and to promote the importance of an active, healthy lifestyle.

The Run the World school talk combines stories from my runs around the world with healthy living advice focusing on exercise, diet and sleep.

I always enjoy giving the talks and this was no exception – the Warren Junior students were a great audience.

After the talk we went outside to the school playground with the cross country and Panathlon teams (pictured above) to run a kilometre or so. There were 35 of us at the start – and 120 at the end as other students joined in. Great fun!

We ended up running about a kilometre and a half in the school grounds and then Head of School Jamie Bell and I set off to complete our 10 km run round the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. We headed north towards Marks Gate, then southwest to Little Heath and south to Chadwell Heath.

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And while we were running, Jamie told me his story which, with his permission, I’ll repeat here.

When Jamie hit 40 he went for a health check. At the time he weighed 19 stone and, at the end of the check-up, his doctor turned to him and said, “A third of you doesn’t need to be here.”

Not long afterwards, he was on holiday in Las Vegas, went to an Elvis Presley museum and noticed that he made the notoriously overweight Elvis look slim.*

He came back to the UK, was diagnosed as pre-diabetic, and decided something had to change. A lot of hard work followed and eventually he slimmed down to 12 stone. A third of him was no longer there.

I asked him how he did it – eating less ; exercising more ; eating better? “Eat less ; move more” was his succinct summary.

Back to the run. From Chadwell Heath, we ran to Furze Infant School – which feeds a lot of students to Warren Junior School – for a picture with Headteacher Junaida Bana.

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And finally back to the school playground for the final few meters of our 10  km.

It just remains for me to say that I very much hope the students enjoyed the talk and run as much as I enjoyed meeting them!

And I also hope they will stay involved with Run the World – either via social media (links below) or by joining in the UK, and final, leg of Run the World on Hampstead Heath on 4th July 2020.

Finally, a huge thank you to Jamie Bell, Mairead Pryor, Ashley and all the staff at the school for the invitation, run and warm welcome!

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitterbecause it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

 *For younger readers, Elvis Presley was probably the biggest pop star in the world in the late 1950s and early 60s. Towards the end of his life he put on a lot of weight and apparently weighed 159 kilos / 25 stone at his death.

The picture below is of Elvis in his early days – is it my imagination or does he look a bit like Warren Junior’s Head of School?

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Germany – Berlin

Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 27th October, 2019

Time : 1h 24’ 28”

Number of runners (total to date) : 30 (6436)

Run map and details :   https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/4203660122

As regular readers will be aware, I’ve had the pleasure of running with hashers all over the world including in HollandGhanaSierra Leone, EstoniaAntiguaSt Kitts & NevisAzerbaijanDominican Republic, Austria and London. (For anyone’s who’s interested, the Ghana blog includes the hash origin story and the basics of how it all works.)

Whether I’m joining an actual hash, or just running with hashers, I’ve always had a warm welcome so, as I was in Berlin for the weekend, I thought I’d try the local hash.

There were 30 of us at the start at Nordbahnhof and three routes to choose from – a running route, a walking route and a ‘taking it easy’ trail.

Now, every hash is different and the Berlin hash was slightly unusual (in my experience) in that the running route was by far the most popular. And plenty of the runners ran at a fair pace. Which was great for me as I’ve got an 7 country trip coming up and I need the training or I won’t get through all the runs and travel.*

The route even took us up a proper thigh trembler of a climb

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to a disused anti-aircraft missile site. Which was perfect for views over Berlin, a hash flash or two

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and even a spot of booty shaking…

And just to reassure anyone who might be interested in hashing but isn’t so keen on running fast: hashes are deliberately designed with check points where you have to cast around for the trail. Which has the happy effect of ensuring that the pack regroups on a regular basis and that the FRBs don’t get separated from the rest.

Including searching around for the trail, I’d run a little over 8 km by the time we got back to Nordbahnhof. I therefore needed to run a further 2 km and headed off to the nearby Mauerpark to complete my 10 km in what had been no man’s land at the centre of the wall . (If you’ve any interest in the Berlin Wall and post war history/ politics then the Mauerpark is highly recommended.)

10 km finished, I joined the circle. Many songs (the Berlin hash has a particularly inventive repertoire) and many ‘down downs’ (punishments involving downing beer) ensued. My crimes deserving of down downs included being a visitor ; not wearing any hash gear ; being ‘just Dan’ (i.e. not having a hash name) ; and pointing with my figure in breach of hash etiquette that hashers point with their elbows. (Alcohol free beer was available for anyone who for health / religious / other reasons wanted to avoid alcohol.)

I’ve talked a bit in this blog about how the Berlin hash differs from other kennels I’ve run with. But in the most important ways it’s like every other hash I’ve ever come across. Everyone was very friendly and welcoming and it genuinely felt like a family. If I lived in Berlin I’d be a regular!

Thank you to to Phil and Dee for hosting me for the weekend in Berlin and thank you to every member of the Berlin hash – it was a pleasure meeting you and I’d love to see you all in London on 4th July 2020 for the UK, and final, leg of Run the World!

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

*I’m currently undertaking a challenge – Run the World – to complete a 10 km run in all 206 countries in the world. I’m running the world to raise funds for Cancer Research and promote the importance of an active, healthy lifestyle.

 

 

 

 

 

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Run 181 : Czech Republic – Prague

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 18th October, 2019

Time : 53’ 22”

Number of runners (total to date) :  1 (6406)

Run map and details :   https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/4176259252

I’ve always wanted to go to Prague and, for various reasons, never made it. So I was really looking forward to running there.

And perhaps it was therefore inevitable that it would be just about my most disappointing run to date.

I’d spent an hour travelling from my hotel to Modranska skola tram stop about 8 kilometres south of Prague. I’m sure the local residents would tell you it’s a fine part of the world. However, I suspect it doesn’t feature highly on most tourist itineraries.

Unless, of course, you’re a graffiti aficionado in which case there’s plenty to see. Lots if it of the tag and scrawl variety but some of it quite eye catching.

After waiting at the tram stop for some time I came to the rather sad conclusion that no one else was joining me. I realised that I either needed to get back on a tram into town – or start running.

By now it was starting to get dark and I figured there must be a reason that fate had led me to Modranska skola. So I started running. Along a few roads and down to the Vltava (mistakenly referred to as the Danube in the video below).

And then, via a wrong turn or two, north along the Vltava back to the centre of Prague.

There’s not a lot a more to say about the run. It was my fourth run in 72 hours and I’d had a lot of niggles in the lead up to the trip so I was quite pleased that I’d been able to accelerate during the run finishing with a 4’35” kilometre. (Good for me ; not so good for Eliud Kipchoge).

And that’s it. I never did discover why fate took me to Modranska skola.

The best bit about the run was finishing at the Charles Bridge which really is magnificent (unlike my video).

And not a bad place to plank. My thanks to the group from India who took the planking photo above.

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It was a lonely visit that had little or no impact  no Run the World talks, no fundraising and no one to run with. Not what I was hoping for. But I saw just enough of Prague to know that its wonderful. I’ll definitely be back.

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

Facts & Stats

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia.

The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in Central Europe that covers an area of 78,866 square kilometers (30,450 sq mi) with a mostly temperate continental climate and oceanic climate. It is a unitary parliamentary republic, with 10.7 million inhabitants. Its capital and largest city is Prague, with 1.3 million residents; other major cities are BrnoOstravaOlomouc and Pilsen.

Following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, the whole Crown of Bohemia was gradually integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy. The Protestant Bohemian Revolt (1618–20) against the Catholic Habsburgs led to the Thirty Years’ War. After the Battle of the White Mountain, the Habsburgs consolidated their rule, eradicated Protestantism, reimposed Catholicism, and adopted a policy of gradual Germanization. This contributed to anti-Habsburg sentiment and resentment of the Catholic Church that continues to this day. With the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, the Bohemian Kingdom became part of the Austrian Empire (1804 to 1867) and the Czech language experienced a revival as a consequence of widespread romantic nationalism. In the 19th century, the Czech lands became the industrial powerhouse of the monarchy and were subsequently the core of the First Czechoslovak Republic, which was formed in 1918 following the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire after World War I.

Czechoslovakia was the only democracy in Central Europe during the interwar period. However, parts of the country were occupied by Germany in World War II, while the Slovak region became a German puppet state. Czechoslovakia was liberated in 1945 by the Soviet Union and the United States. Most of the German-speaking minority were expelled following the war. The Communist Party of Czechoslovakia won the 1946 elections and after the 1948 coup d’état established a one-party communist state under Soviet influence. Increasing dissatisfaction with the regime culminated in 1968 to the reform movement known as the Prague Spring, which ended in a Soviet-led invasion. Czechoslovakia remained occupied until the 1989 Velvet Revolution, which peacefully ended communist rule and re-established democracy and a market economy. On 1 January 1993, Czechoslovakia peacefully dissolved, with its constituent states becoming the independent states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

The Czech Republic is a developed country with an advancedhigh income social market economy. It is a welfare state with a European social modeluniversal health care, and tuition-free university education. It ranks 15th in the UN inequality-adjusted human development and 14th in the World Bank Human Capital Index ahead of countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France. It ranks as the eleventh safest and most peaceful country and performs strongly in democratic governance. The Czech Republic joined NATO in 1999 and the European Union (EU) in 2004.

 World Bank Data

Here’s the latest World Bank data for the Czech Republic – with the year 2000 as a comparison.

GDP $245.2 bn 2018 $61.6 bn 2000
         
Population 10.6 m 2018 10.3 m 2000
         
Primary school enrolment* 101% 2017 103% 2000
         
CO2 Emissions** 9.2 2014 12.1 2000
         
% below poverty line*** 9.7% 2013 10.4% 2004
         
Life expectancy at birth 79.5 yrs 2017 75.0 yrs 2000
         
GNI per capita $20 260 2018 $6 330 2000

*Percentage can exceed 100% due to the inclusion of over and under aged students

** Metric tons per capita

***The World Bank notes that the methodology can vary between countries and over time within a given country. (While much of the World Bank data generally follows understandable trends, this number often oscillates wildly suggesting that different methodologies are frequently used over time within a given country.)

Greatest Sporting Nation Data

Finally, here’s the data from Greatest Sporting Nation on how the Czech Republic performed in the global sporting arena in 2018:

Global Cup – 24th

Per Capita Cup – 16th

The Global Cup aggregates results from over 1000 events across 80 sports to produce the definitive annual ranking of international sporting success. The Per Capita Cup uses the same data to produce an annual per capita ranking.

 

 

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Slovakia – Bratislava

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 16th October, 2019

Time : 49’ 50” (fastest time in central Europe and rare sub 50 minute run)

Number of runners (total to date) :  1 (6399)

Run map and details :   https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/4176259195

The train from Budapest to Bratislava costs 9 euros and takes just over 2 hours. There’s masses of leg room, you can move around at will and I had connectivity throughout the journey. You then arrive in the city centre, a few minutes from your hotel.

If I’d taken the plane I’d have had to get to the airport two (usually completely unnecessary) hours before the flight. And it would have cost I don’t know what for an unconnected space that I could hardly fit my legs into.

The flight would also have done damage to the environment before disgorging me at an airport nowhere near my final destination.

Please, world, build lots of (very) high speed train connections. So we can all go on enjoying the benefits of travel (especially poor countries that rely on tourism) without killing the planet.

As you’ll have gathered, I enjoyed travelling by train rather than flying. I also enjoyed my run in Bratislava.

I started at the Holy Trinity Column (why are all my selfies so appalling?)

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in the historic centre before making my way down to the banks of the Danube so blau.

I then ran west past the castle

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and along the Danube for 2.5 km before turning around and heading back past my start point and the historic centre as far as the Eurovea shopping centre.

Turning round again I finished the run in the historic centre, past Ganymede’s Fountain through the main square

to the Schone Naci Statue where lots of tourists were taking photos. Some of those tourists were good enough to take a photo of my now traditional plank – before joining in the plank.

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There’s a nice story behind the statue. Schöner Náci was the son of a shoemaker and grandson of a famous clown and was inspired by the latter’s example to bring happiness to the streets of the city. He walked around the Old Town in top hat and tails, greeting women with the words, “I kiss your hand” in GermanHungarian and Slovak.

Plank over, I then ran the last two kilometres around the old town before finishing at St. Michael’s Gate.

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Bratislava’s old town is pedestrianised which, combined with the pathway along the Danube, makes it a great place for a city run. You should try it – but make sure to travel there by train!

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

Facts & Stats

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia.

Slovakia is a landlocked country in Central Europe. Slovakia’s territory spans about 49,000 square kilometres (19,000 sq mi) and is mostly mountainous. The population is over 5.6 million and consists mostly of Slovaks. The capital and largest city is Bratislava, and the second-largest city is Košice. The official language is Slovak.

In the 10th century, after the dissolution of Great Moravia, the territory was integrated into the Principality of Hungary, which would become the Kingdom of Hungary in 1000. In 1241 and 1242, much of the territory was destroyed by the Mongols during their invasion of Central and Eastern Europe. The area was recovered largely thanks to Béla IV of Hungary who also settled Germans who became an important ethnic group in the area. World War I and the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Czechoslovak National Council established Czechoslovakia (1918–1939). A separate (First) Slovak Republic (1939–1945) existed during World War II as a totalitarianclero-fascist one-party client state of Nazi Germany. At the end of World War II, Czechoslovakia was re-established as an independent country. After a coup in 1948 Czechoslovakia became a totalitarian one-party socialist state under a communist administration, during which the country was part of the Soviet led Eastern Bloc. Attempts to liberalize communism in Czechoslovakia culminated in the Prague Spring, which was crushed by the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968. In 1989, the Velvet Revolution ended the Communist rule in Czechoslovakia peacefully. Slovakia became an independent state on 1 January 1993 after the peaceful dissolution of Czechoslovakia, sometimes known as the Velvet Divorce.

Slovakia is a high-income advanced economy with a very high Human Development Index, a very high standard of living and performs favourably in measurements of civil libertiespress freedominternet freedomdemocratic governance and peacefulness. The country maintains a combination of a market economy with a comprehensive social security system. Citizens of Slovakia are provided with universal health carefree education and one of the longest paid parental leaves in the OECD. The country joined the European Union on 1 May 2004 and joined the Eurozone on 1 January 2009. Slovakia is also a member of the Schengen Area. As part of Eurozone, Slovak legal tender is the euro. Slovakia is the world’s largest per-capita car producer with a total of 1,090,000 cars manufactured in the country in 2018 aloneand the 6th largest car producer in the European Union, representing 43% of Slovakia’s total industrial output.

 World Bank Data

Here’s the latest World Bank data for Slovakia – with the year 2000 as a comparison.

GDP $106.5 bn 2018 $29.1 bn 2000
         
Population 5.4 m 2018 5.4 m 2000
         
Primary school enrolment* 99% 2017 101% 2000
         
CO2 Emissions** 5.7 2014 6.7 2000
         
% below poverty line*** 12.6% 2013 13.3% 2004
         
Life expectancy at birth 77.2 yrs 2017 73.1 yrs 2000
         
GNI per capita $18 330 2018 $5 500 2000

*Percentage can exceed 100% due to the inclusion of over and under aged students

** Metric tons per capita

***The World Bank notes that the methodology can vary between countries and over time within a given country. (While much of the World Bank data generally follows understandable trends, this number often oscillates wildly suggesting that different methodologies are frequently used over time within a given country.)

Greatest Sporting Nation Data

Finally, here’s the data from Greatest Sporting Nation on how Slovakia performed in the global sporting arena in 2018:

Global Cup – 35th

Per Capita Cup – 18th

The Global Cup aggregates results from over 1000 events across 80 sports to produce the definitive annual ranking of international sporting success. The Per Capita Cup uses the same data to produce an annual per capita ranking.

 

 

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