Run 174 : Iceland – Reykjavik

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

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Date : 10th September, 2019

Time : 1h 0’ 57”

Number of runners (total to date) : 31 (6294)

Run map and details :   https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/4053241540

The conversation turned, as it sometimes does on these runs, to Brexit. “I thought you left Europe in 2016,” one of my fellow runners said to me with a smile on his face. It took me a second to realise he wasn’t referencing the EU referendum of the 23rd June 2016.

No, he was referring to Iceland knocking England out of the European (football) Championship on 27th June 2016. An evening I remember vividly. Partly for the shock of the two almost simultaneous exits. And partly for the Icelandic clap – one of the best football ‘chants’ ever and probably the only bright spot that evening.

Continuing with the football theme, about 30 of us met at the stadium of KR Reykjavik – Iceland’s most successful club team (26 times national champions). The run had been organised by Helga of Go Running Tours and Margret from the KR-skokk running club and at least half of the runners were in training for the upcoming Berlin marathon. Luckily for me, they were in the tapering down phase of their training so the pace wasn’t too ferocious…

Our run took us along the coastline

to Reykjavik Nautholsvik beach where we stopped for water and to regroup. I know what readers unfamiliar with Iceland will now be thinking. ‘A beach in Reykjavik – can’t imagine that gets many swimmers!’

However, it’s a geothermal beach so the water is warmer than you’d expect and there were quite a few swimmers there when we ran past on an evening that was decidedly chilly (the image below isn’t from our run)

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From there we ran across the peninsular to the northern shoreline and our second regrouping point with views of Harpa Concert Hall in the background.

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The run continued past Reykjavik’s downtown area and docks before finishing back at the KR Reykjavik ground. Where I introduced the group to the Six Pack Challenge and the concept of the post run plank. (Thank you everyone for joining in – I think I might have felt a little foolish planking on my own!)

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By this time the rain was setting in so, Thorlakur, one of the KR-skokk coaches, was good enough to give me a lift back into town in his car with its magnificent collection of dashboard elves. (And, no, contrary to popular myth, Icelanders don’t believe in elves – these had been bought to support a local charity.)

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I also learnt that Iceland were playing that night – in a Euro 2020 championship qualifier – so it seemed fitting to watch the football over dinner that night. Sadly Iceland lost 4-2 to Albania….

It just remains for to say an enormous thank you to Helga, Margret, Thorlakur, Tinna and all my fellow runners / plankers for the help and support. I loved my time in Reykjavik and hope to be back one day!

If any of you can make it, then I’d love to see you in London on 4th July 2020 for the UK, and final, leg of Run the World!

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

Facts & Stats

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia.

Iceland is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic, with a population of 360,390 and an area of 103,000 km2 (40,000 sq mi), making it the most sparsely populated country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Reykjavík, with Reykjavík and the surrounding areas in the southwest of the country being home to over two-thirds of the population. Iceland is volcanically and geologically active. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude almost entirely outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence keep summers chilly, with most of the archipelago having a tundra climate.

According to the ancient manuscript Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in 874 AD when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent settler on the island.In the following centuries, Norwegians, and to a lesser extent other Scandinavians, emigrated to Iceland, bringing with them thralls (i.e., slaves or serfs) of Gaelic origin.

The island was governed as an independent commonwealth under the Althing, one of the world’s oldest functioning legislative assemblies. Following a period of civil strife, Iceland acceded to Norwegian rule in the 13th century.

In the wake of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, Iceland’s struggle for independence took form and culminated in independence in 1918 and the founding of a republic in 1944.

Iceland has a market economy with relatively low taxes, compared to other OECD countries as well as the highest trade union membership in the world. It maintains a Nordic social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens. Iceland ranks high in economic, democratic, social stability, and equality, currently ranking first in the world by median wealth per adult. In 2018, it was ranked as the sixth most developed country in the world by the United Nations’ Human Development Index, and it ranks first on the Global Peace Index. Iceland runs almost completely on renewable energy.

Hit hard by the worldwide financial crisis, the nation’s entire banking system systemically failed in October 2008, leading to a severe depression, substantial political unrest, the Icesave dispute, and the institution of capital controls. Some bankers were jailed. Since then, the economy has made a significant recovery, in large part due to a surge in tourism.

Icelandic culture is founded upon the nation’s Scandinavian heritage. Most Icelanders are descendants of Norse and Gaelic settlers. Icelandic, a North Germanic language, is descended from Old West Norse and is closely related to Faroese. Iceland has the smallest population of any NATO member and is the only one with no standing army, with a lightly armed coast guard.

World Bank Data

Here’s the latest World Bank data for Iceland – with the year 2000 as a comparison.

GDP $25.9 bn 2018 $9 bn 2000
Population 354 k 2018 281 k 2000
Primary school enrolment* 100% 2016 103% 2000
CO2 Emissions** 6.1 2014 7.7 2000
% below poverty line*** NA NA
Life expectancy at birth 82.2 yrs 2017 79.7 yrs 2000
GNI per capita $60 740 2017 $31 550 2000

*Percentage can exceed 100% due to the inclusion of over and under aged students

** Metric tons per capita

***The World Bank notes that the methodology can vary between countries and over time within a given country. (While much of the World Bank data generally follows understandable trends, this number often oscillates wildly suggesting that different methodologies are frequently used over time within a given country.)

Greatest Sporting Nation Data

Finally, here’s the data from Greatest Sporting Nation on how Iceland performed in the global sporting arena in 2018:

Global Cup – NA

Per Capita Cup – NA

The Global Cup aggregates results from over 1000 events across 80 sports to produce the definitive annual ranking of international sporting success. The Per Capita Cup uses the same data to produce an annual per capita ranking.

 

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The Six Pack Challenge

A good friend of ours – Annette – has a significant birthday coming up on 7th April 2020. And when her husband – Jeff- asked her what she’d like for her birthday, she said she’d like him to have a six pack. A visible one.

Not being averse to taking on ridiculous challenges, as soon as I heard this I asked if others could join in. Annette and Jeff graciously agreed that the challenge was open to all comers and we were off and running (and crunching…).

I’ll do a separate blog about the health benefits of a six pack – and advice on how to get one. For the moment, suffice it to say that planking is part of our exercise routine.

And the thing about planking is that it can be done almost anywhere. At the airport.

 

In IKEA

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(From flat pack to six pack as Anthony quipped. )

In Venice

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As a group in a pool (this is known as a plankton shot)

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While deep sea diving

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And even after a run in Reykjavik.

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If you’d like to take part in the Six Pack Challenge, or you’ve got any good planking pics, then do get in touch: info@run-the-world.org; @dtruntheworld (Twitter and Insta) ; https://www.facebook.com/RunTheWorldChallenge

But PLEASE remember :

– If your back, or any other part of your body, starts to hurt while you’re planking, then STOP!

– Don’t plank anywhere dangerous!

 

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London Run 10 : Merton with Pretty Muddy

 

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

 Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 31st August, 2019

Time : 1h 10’ 03”

Number of runners (total to date) : 2 (6263)

Run map and details : https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/4008969316

Climbing over and under obstacles – through and into mud baths – while being sprayed with cold water. Honestly, does that sound like fun ? Or something any sane person would do?

And yet, apparently, 5 million people in 40 countries take part in obstacle races each year. Tough Mudder, set up by an British ex counter-terrorism officer, has had over 3 million participants since its inception in 2010.

In fact, muddy obstacle races have proved so popular that Cancer Research’s Race for Life now offers Pretty Muddy events alongside its runs and walks. (For anyone not familiar with Race for Life , it’s one of the great British institutions. The first Race for Life was held in Battersea in 1994 when 750 participants raised £48,000. 25 years later, 8 million people have taken part in events across the country raising £550 million along the way.)

So, when I saw that there was a Pretty Muddy event in Morden, it seemed like a great opportunity to do my London Borough of Merton run* while trying something new and, umm, muddy.

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Now anyone who’s ever used the Northern Line – which is quite a few people because it is London’s busiest tube line with c 300 million journeys per year – will be familiar with Morden. Because, as the tube announcements never fail tell you at each stop, southern journeys on the Northern Line go to Morden via Bank or Charing Cross. (To be entirely accurate, some of Charing Cross branch trains terminate at Kennington.)

While we’re on the subject, have you ever wondered why the Northern Line is so inhumanely nose-to-armpit packed at rush hour ? It’s because the service is limited to 24 trains per hour due to the two branches sharing stations. If the two lines could be segregated there’d be up to 36 trains per hour at peak times.

Ok, ok, enough of the public transport ; back to the run.

Even if you’re familiar with Morden you may not know Morden Park – 50 hectares of green about a mile from Morden tube station. And the site for last Saturday’s Pretty Muddy event.

As the course is c 5km long, and I need to do 10km in each borough, I got there a little early, ran a few kilometres and filmed the previous wave tackling the obstacles. (For obvious reasons, it’s not advisable to take your phone with you on a Pretty Mudder.)

Back to the start where I met up with my sister, Charis, who’d gamely, if perhaps foolishly, agreed to join me.  This is her – and her back message – pre-mud.

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(Post mud pic below.)

You start with a warm up

before making your way to the first obstacle. Where you crawl through mud, under netting, while being sprayed with cold muddy water. Lovely…

After that you go over under and through various obstacles before the grand finale – a climb and then slide into another mud bath.

All great fun and, if you want a fun, accessible introduction to muddy obstacle courses – or a novel way to fund raise for Cancer Research – then Pretty Muddy is almost certainly for you!

It just remains for me to thank my sister for getting muddy with me

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and to thank Jessica, Lizzie and all the CRUK staff and volunteers who make these events so great!

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*Most of you reading this will know that the idea of Run the World is to complete a 10 km run in all 206 countries in the world. Many of you will also know that we’ve decided to add an additional 44 runs in the UK to take the global total to 250 runs.

Why? Because 250 runs is equivalent to running 2 500 000 metres. Which is a metre for every one of the two and a half million cancer sufferers in the UK.

All well and good but the question we asked ourselves at Run the World HQ is : where should those 44 UK runs take place? And part of the answer – three-quarters to be exact – is that 33 of them will take place in London. One in each of the 32 London boroughs plus one in the City of London.

We’re calling this the ‘London Borough Challenge’ and we’re really hoping that everyone will take part in some – or all – of the LBC!

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitterbecause it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

 

 

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UK Run 9 : Leek

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 13th July, 2019

Number of runners (total to date) : 3 (6261)

Time : 1h 9’ 34”

Run map and details :  https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3848467593

My grandmother died of cancer. My uncle Mark died of cancer (at the tragically early age of 49). My mother died of cancer.

Cancer is our family enemy.

So, when we all met up in Leek for a family reunion, it seemed appropriate for us to do one of Run the World’s 250 x 10 km runs. (I’m fundraising for Cancer Research ; 250 runs is equivalent to running 2 500 000 metres – which is a metre for every one of the UK’s two and a half million cancer sufferers. )

Caroline, Mark’s daughter, Charis, my sister, Matthew, my brother, and I set off from the Peak Weavers hotel.

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Charis walked but the rest of us ran north up King St, turned right onto Broad Street and almost immediately came to the Leek Oatcake Shop.

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For anyone unfamiliar with this local delicacy, oatcakes are like savoury pancakes and, contrary to some misguided opinion, are best eaten with poached eggs.

Back to the run. Matt’s one request wrt the route was that we should run somewhere flat. So Caroline immediately led us to the local park – which must be just about the hilliest park I’ve ever been to outside of the Himalayas. She then took us back through the famous Market Square

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to Leek Cemetery where our grandparents are buried.

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A cemetery which also happens to feature the steepest climb in the whole of the Peak District…

After 5 km Caroline peeled off, satisfied that her work was done.

Matt and I caught our breath and reviewed our options for the 2nd 5 km. We could have run to our grandparents home on Cheddleton Heath road. But that was a little too far.

We could also have run towards Stoke, home of the mighty Stoke City FC. The club where my cousin Nick had a youth trial and, in so doing, became something of a hero to his football mad cousin.

Now, in recent years it has become fashionable to disparage Stoke’s long ball tactics and their dedication to the concept of football as a contact sport. However, Nick’s trial was in the 1970s when Stoke won the 1972 League Cup with a line-up of Gordon Banks ; Jackie Marsh ; Mike Pejic ; Mike Bernard ; Dennis Smith ; Alan Bloor ; Terry Conroy ; Jimmy Greenhoff ; John Ritchie ; Peter Dobing ; and George Eastham. (I thought John Mahoney played but Wikipedia tells me otherwise.)

At the time they were, I think it’s fair to say, “By far the greatest team, the world has ever seen.”

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Enough reminiscing. Back, again, to the run.

We eventually decided to run to what we think of as the Leek Show grounds (aka Birchall Playing Fields). I’ve never previously seen it without thousands of people, multitudes of sheep being chased around by sheep dogs, fairground attractions, home baked goods, random bits of farm machinery, competitively oversized vegetables – and my grandparents handing out prizes. (For the avoidance of doubt, those are not our grandparents in the photo below.)

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Turns out that there’s also a running track there so Matt and I ran round that a few times in the setting sun

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before heading back to the hotel and the reunion dinner with Dad, Sylvia

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Auntie Diana, Brian,

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Nick, Amanda, Caroline, Charis and Matt.

A wonderful run and a wonderful weekend. I hope to see as many of you as possible in London on 4th July, 2020 for the UK, and final, leg of Run the World!

For Granny, Mark and Mum. And Grampa and Stevie. And all our other lost but not forgotten family members.

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If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

 

 

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Southfield Academy

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 11th July, 2019

Number of talk attendees (total to date) : 110 (4847)

Number of runners (total to date) : 80 (6258)

Run map and details : https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3837961539

I’m currently undertaking a challenge – Run the World – to complete a 10 km run in all 206 countries in the world. (I’ve run in 173 countries to date.) I’m doing the challenge to raise funds for Cancer Research and to promote the importance of an active, healthy lifestyle.

A couple of years ago I was running in Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic, and I was asked to give a talk at a local school about my experiences. It seemed to go well and ever since then I’ve been giving an increasing number of talks.

Run the World now offers schools a menu of activities including the talk ; a Q&A session ; a run ; and in-talk exercise sessions. And Ms Davies – Head of PE & Sport at Southfields Academy was kind enough to invite me to give a talk to Y 7 – followed by a run and a stretching session.

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The talk starts with stories about my runs around the world – the extraordinary, and often inspiring, people I’ve met and things I’ve seen. Then we move on to the healthy living section of the talk finishing with the slide that really summarises why I do these talks.

In 2018, Harvard aggregated a huge amount of research on healthy living and its impact on life expectancy. The conclusion? If you adopt the five healthy habit referred to in the talk – healthy weight, diet and levels of exercise combined with no smoking and no/low alcohol consumption – then, on average, women will live 14 years longer and men will live 12 years longer. Even adopting one healthy habit will, on average, extend your life by two years.

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So far, so good. And so far, so normal. Then it was my turn to listen. Led by Ms Davies, three of the teachers stood up to talk about why they run.

They were extremely eloquent and it reminded me why I’ve fallen in love with running. As one of the teachers put it, it doesn’t matter how bad the weather is, you’ll always be glad afterwards that you went for a run. It’s great socially – both as an activity to do with friends and family but also as a way to meet new people. (It’s the way one of the teachers stays in touch with her sister.) And, of course, for most people, it’s highly beneficial for their physical and mental health.

And, if the thought of running itself doesn’t appeal, why not combine it with fundraising for Cancer Research or plogging (jogging while picking up plastic) or doing good deeds?

There ends my appeal to readers to give running a go – time to get back to the story.

After the talks, we went outside for a 1 km run – partly in King George’s Park and partly around the school’s all-weather pitch (part of the school’s excellent sporting facilities).

As I ran with the students I thought about how, when I was their age, I didn’t run. And how much I wish I had. Partly for the reasons listed above and partly because it would have made me so much better at football / cricket / rugby / hockey (team sports being my then obsession.)

Oops, I seem to be back on my mission to encourage everyone to run..

Anyway, after the run, and a quick stretching session

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I asked Ms Davies how long she thought it should take a reasonably fit person to run a kilometre. Obviously it depends on age, but her view was that 6 minutes would be right for someone in Y 7. (As an aside, please do get in touch if you know of any generally accepted standards in terms of how far / fast people should be able to run at different ages.)

So there you have it. Lots of reasons to run – and a target to aim for if you do take up running!

It just remains for me to say that I very much hope the students enjoyed the talk as much as I enjoyed meeting them!

And I also hope they will stay involved with Run the World – either via social media (links below) or by joining in the UK, and final, leg of Run the World on Hampstead Heath on 4thJuly 2020.

Finally, a big thank you to Charlotte Davies and all the staff at the school for the invitation and warm welcome !

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If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

 

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The Matthew Arnold School

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 10th July, 2019

Number of talk attendees (total to date) : 500 (4737)

Number of runners (total to date) : 500 (6178)

Run map and details : https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3833375603

Cancer Research’s Race for Life is one of the great British institutions. The first event was held in Battersea in 1994, when 750 participants raised £48,000. 25 years later, 8 million people have taken part in events across the country raising £550 million along the way.

And the great news is that schools can put on their own Race for Life events – just contact Cancer Research and they will provide you with a load of support. Which is what the Matthew Arnold School had done.

They were also good enough to invite me to talk at the school because I’m currently undertaking a challenge – Run the World – to complete a 10 km run in all 206 countries in the world. (I’ve run in 173 countries to date.) I’m doing the challenge to raise funds for Cancer Research and to promote the importance of an active, healthy lifestyle.

The talk starts with stories about my runs around the world – the extraordinary, and often inspiring, people I’ve met and things I’ve seen. Then we moved on to the healthy living section of the talk finishing with the slide that really summarises why I do these talks.

In 2018, Harvard aggregated a huge amount of research on healthy living and its impact on life expectancy. The conclusion? If you adopt the five healthy habit referred to in the talk – healthy weight, diet and levels of exercise combined with no smoking and no/low alcohol consumption – then, on average, women will live 14 years longer and men will live 12 years longer. Even adopting one healthy habit will, on average, extend your life by two years.

But enough about the talk and Run the World. The main event of the day was the Race for Life.

More than 500 students and staff took part – many in pink skirts / make-up / hair dye / you name it. Everyone went 4 times around the school field before receiving their Race for Life medal.

It was a fantastic occasion and I was struck both by the friendly atmosphere and how the students stuck to the task. The fundraising was also very impressive –  by the time I left the school were on course to raise the best part of £5000.

Cancer Research like to refer to Race for Life as ‘The world’s fastest most important race’ and the event really lived up to that billing. Congratulations to all involved!

It just remains for me to say that I very much hope the students enjoyed the talk as much as I enjoyed meeting them!

And I also hope they will stay involved with Run the World – either via social media (links below) or by joining in the UK, and final, leg of Run the World on Hampstead Heath on 4th July 2020.

Finally, a big thank you to Kirsteen Moore, Headteacher Mary Gould, Mrs Anne Field (Chair of the Board of Governors) and all the staff at the school for the invitation and warm welcome !

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If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

 

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Longfield Primary School

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Please donate generously to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter

Date : 9th July, 2019

Number of talk attendees (total to date) : 750 (4237)

Number of runners (total to date) : 90 (5678)

Run map and details : https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3829088754

We’ve recently introduced exercise sessions as part of the Run the World school visit menu of options. At first glance this may seem a little odd. The schools I visit in the UK, and most of the schools I visit around the world, have PE Depts who are, of course, more than capable of providing students with a high quality exercise session.

However, the Run the World sessions are a little different. They’re designed to fit in with the Run the World school talks. This means that they need to work in a confined space such as an assembly hall. The students also need to be able to do them in their normal school clothes.

The first talk at Longfield Primary School was to nursery, reception and Y 1 students and I must admit I questioned whether they’d benefit from an exercise session. However, Ms Vlachou – the PE teacher at Longfield (pictured above) who invited me to give the talk – politely insisted. And she was absolutely right. We did ‘Giraffe’ ; ‘Toe Touchers’ ; ‘Spaghetti, Meatball, Cheese’ ; ‘Teacup’ ; and ‘Washing Machine’ together and the students all threw themselves into the exercises with great enthusiasm.

Sessions with the Y 2 & 3 students and then the Y 4-6 students followed with the exercises becoming progressively a little more challenging as the audience got older.

The only slight issue was that the person leading the exercises, i.e. me, couldn’t touch his toes or stand like a flamingo with the sole of one foot on the thigh of the other leg…..

However, I’m getting ahead of myself. Let’s go back to the beginning and why an inflexible man with poor balance was leading a series of exercise sessions.

I’m currently undertaking a challenge – Run the World – to complete a 10 km run in all 206 countries in the world. (I’ve run in 173 countries to date.) I’m doing the challenge to raise funds for Cancer Research and to promote the importance of an active, healthy lifestyle.

The Run the World junior school talk combines stories from my runs around the world with healthy living advice focusing on exercise, diet and sleep. The idea behind the exercise sessions is to reinforce the advice about the importance of being active and give students a short set of exercises that are fun and can be done at almost any moment in their lives.

After the talks, I went for a 1 km run with the Y 6 students around the school field. The students were great and I’d love to show you a video of the run or the exercise sessions but, understandably, it wasn’t possible to take pictures of the students.

It’s not that long ago that my own daughters were finishing Y 6 and I know it’s an exciting time with the move to senior school just one summer holiday away.

I wish them all the best for the future and hope that they, and all the other students, enjoyed the talk, the exercises and the run as much as I enjoyed meeting them!

And I also hope they will stay involved with Run the World – either via social media (links below) or by joining in the UK, and final, leg of Run the World on Hampstead Heath on 4th July 2020.

Finally, a big thank you to Ms Vlachou and all the other staff at Longfield for the invitation and warm welcome!

If you’d like to help fight cancer then I and, far more importantly, cancer sufferers around the world, would be immensely grateful for any donations to Cancer Research : https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Dan-Thompson11

Please like / follow Run the World on Facebook , Instagram and Twitter because it would be great to stay in touch and because, however silly it may sound, it makes all the travel and running that little bit easier if you think people care!

 

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